Roofing: To Roll or Not To Roll? • ASAP Roofing Roofing: To Roll or Not To Roll? • ASAP Roofing
On October 17, 2012

Roofing: To Roll or Not To Roll?

When considering roofing restoration, many customers are drawn to rolled roofing for it’s easy installation. However, rolled roofing is intended for very specific purposes and will not suit every roof. So before deciding whether or not rolled roofing is for you, let’s first take a look at what it is, how it is installed, and the pros and cons that come with it.

 

What Is Rolled Roofing?

Rolled roofing is made of the same material as asphalt shingles, and instead of being installed in tiles, as with shingles, it is rolled directly onto the roof.

One important difference between rolled roofing and other types of roofing material is that while shingle type roofing may use rolled material as an underlayment, rolled roofing that is stand-alone is often referred to as mineral-surfaced roll roof.

 

Sizing and Cost

A roofing roll is 36 feet long by 36 inches wide and thus comprises one “square” (100 sq. ft.).

At the bottom of the scale, black roll roofing will cost about $35-$40 per square (100 sq. ft.).

 

Applications

An important consideration in the application of rolled roof is the slope of the roof. Roofs that have a pitch decline that is 2 inches or less vertically per 12 feet horizontally, are appropriate for roll roofing.

Rolled roofing is also used where the aesthetics of the roof are not a top priority, such as sheds, garages, and animal shelters.

 

Pros and Cons of Rolled Roof

Pros:

  • Rolled roofing is the least expensive roofing material, even compared to low-cost composite shingles.
  • As mentioned above, rolled roofing is very easy to apply.
  • Rolled roofing is an excellent choice for protecting against rainwater.

Cons:

  • Rolled roofing is typically considered a less attractive roofing choice than other types of roofing systems.
  • Compared to composite shingles, whose lifespan is roughly 20 years or  more, rolled roofing does not last nearly as long — typically 5-8 years.
  • When using rolled roofing, the resale value of the home is often negatively affected.

 

By Nick Dorotik

nick@asaproofing.com

References:

Asphalt Roofing Manufacturers Association Website FAQs

Owens Corning Website.  “Mineral Surfaced Roll”

  • By kirk  2 Comments 
  • 2 Comments

    Posted by training for weight loss on
    • Jul 30 2015
    Reply  
    Appreciate the recommendation. Will try it out.
    Posted by Joe on
    • Feb 18 2018
    Reply  
    Have 1.2 pitch roof on part of house want to put roll roofing have a deck going right ove it the roof should not get any sun would it last longer ten 10 years with shade over it

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