On November 21, 2016

Got Moss? Why It Matters and What You Should Do

Moss roofWhile you might have chosen a nice shade of taupe, sandy beige, and even sage for your roof, you probably didn’t choose bright green. But if you’ve got moss, your roof can look about as green as your lawn and if you have your house on the market, your potential buyers are not likely to be impressed. But more importantly, moss is one of your roof’s worst enemies. Not just does moss expose your roof to rot and structural damage, it also exposes you to mold.

So if your roof is looking a little green – and it’s not a part of your sustainability program – here are three removal options you should know about.

Zinc Sulfate. Applying zinc sulfate to your roof quickly kills moss, causing it to darken in color and shrivel up so that it can then be removed. Zinc sulfate is so powerful that it can keep your roof moss-free for up to seven years. However, because zinc sulfate is very strong and toxic, it should only be applied by a professional.

Laundry detergent. Like zinc sulfate, laundry detergent quickly kills moss. However, unlike zinc sulfate, laundry detergent can dry out your roofing materials, and in some cases, damage your roof.

Bleach solution. Bleach, in many ways might be the best option if you want to tackle the moss yourself. It can be easily applied, kills it instantly, removes the stains, and doesn’t damage your roof. The downside? It doesn’t prevent future from growing again.

Moss can be easily removed, however, you must always use a chemical first. Attempting to scrape it off without first disabling it chemically can damage your roof. And if you are not sure which chemical to use, it is always best to consult a licensed roofing contractor.

This article is brought to you by ASAP Roofing, a national roofing company that specializes in hail restoration, weatherization, and exceptional customer service. ASAP has offices in Denver, Dallas, Indianapolis, and Salt Lake City.

Contact Roofing Contractor Denver

Contact Us today for Guidance on roof restoration from hail damage.

  • By Joe Carroll  0 Comments 

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